February 23, 2018

NEWS & Analysis

News & Analysis

Who’s Messianic Now?

January 23, 2018

It may be difficult to digest America’s resort to pseudo-biblical literalism to engage with one of the world’s thorniest issues, laughable even. But, in Pence’s case, it is hardly a surprise.

News & Analysis

Barred from Israel: Hardly a Surprise

January 18, 2018

I received the news of the ban with indifference, something my privilege as a white American allows me. However, the same is not true for millions of Palestinians around the world.

News & Analysis

What Would Happen if Trump Cut UNRWA Funding?

January 8, 2018

A total US funding cut would mean a serious reduction in services and the complete halt of many of the education and health programmes for Palestinian refugees.

PALESTINE UNBOUND

Palestine Unbound

#FreeAhed

February 20, 2018

The campaign that has rallied to free Ahed’s is unlikely to achieve its objective anytime soon, but such efforts propel the growth of powerful movements.

Palestine Unbound

H.R. 4391: #NoWayToTreatAChild

November 16, 2017

Congress has seen critics of Israel and defenders of Palestinian rights before, but none matched McCollum’s historic act.

SPECIAL SERIES

BOOK REVIEWS

Institute for Palestine Studies

Institute for Palestine Studies

Journal of Palestine Studies

Journal of Palestine Studies

Jerusalem Quarterly

Jerusalem Quarterly

Bookstore

Bookstore

100 Years’ War

Facebook

Instagram

  • As Palestinians move to mark 70 years since the Nakba, or catastrophe, it is important to recall certain events that paved the way for the establishment of Israel in May, 1948, which led to the expulsion of approximately 750,000 Palestinians from their homes. Today, descendants of these refugees are estimated at five million who live in refugee camps around the world, and are not allowed to return to their homeland. 
During a British post-World War II Cabinet meeting, held on February 14, 1947, the British government had decided to “refer the problem of Palestine to the judgement of the General Assembly of the United Nations,” and withdraw its troops from the territory at a date no later than June 1948. The British government recognized that the situation “had become progressively more intractable.” Palestine had been under British mandate for twenty-five years since the League of Nations entrusted Britain with the territory in 1922 in the aftermath of World War I. Even though the mandate incorporated the infamous Balfour Declaration (1917), which promised to create “in Palestine a national home for the Jewish people,” Britain was tasked with ensuring that such a promise would not infringe the rights of the Palestinian natives of the land. 
However, the British 1947 decision to refer the question of Palestine to the U.N. foretold the catastrophe that befell the Palestinians only fifteen months later. By June, 1948, nearly two months after the establishment of Israel, the departure of British troops had neared its completion. This photo shows a British soldier hauling down the Union Jack for the last time at Haifa harbor. (check link in bio to learn more)