January 16, 2018

NEWS & Analysis

News & Analysis

What Would Happen if Trump Cut UNRWA Funding?

January 8, 2018

A total US funding cut would mean a serious reduction in services and the complete halt of many of the education and health programmes for Palestinian refugees.

News & Analysis

Trump Deepens America’s Isolation

December 21, 2017

Rarely has the action of an American president on the Middle East been so universally unpopular outside the bubbles of Israeli and American public opinion.

PALESTINE UNBOUND

Palestine Unbound

H.R. 4391: #NoWayToTreatAChild

November 16, 2017

Congress has seen critics of Israel and defenders of Palestinian rights before, but none matched McCollum’s historic act.

Palestine Unbound

#StandWithIssa

September 14, 2017

Since Issa Amro’s arrest, many local and international rights groups called for his immediate release, launching the hashtag #StandWithIssa.

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Journal of Palestine Studies

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Jerusalem Quarterly

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100 Years’ War

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  • On December 9, 2017, Palestinians marked 30 years since the First Intifada, which erupted on December 9, 1987. Six months later, in June 1988, under the title “Kissinger Behind Closed Doors,” Harper’s Magazine published an extraordinary confidential memorandum describing a breakfast meeting held by American Jewish leaders with Henry Kissinger on January 31, 1988, to discuss the Palestinian uprising that had broken out almost two months earlier. The memorandum, written by Julius Berman, the former chair of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, and sent to a group of friends, was leaked to the press in March 1988.

In the memorandum, which was republished by the Journal of Palestine Studies, Berman summarized Kissinger’s views in three main points: “1. Now is not the time for Jewish community leaders to publicly attack Israel or its policies with respect to the Palestinians; 
2. Israel should bar the media from entry into the territories involved in the present demonstrations, accept the short-term criticism of the world press for such conduct, and put down the insurrection as quickly as possible— overwhelmingly, brutally, and rapidly; 
3. The proposed international peace conference, as presently conceived by Foreign Minister [Shimon] Peres, may lead to a ‘disaster’ for Israel.” Nearly 30 years after that meeting, Kissinger's propositions continue to guide Israel’s actions today and have since manifested in numerous ways. For instance, during the Israeli assault on the Gaza Strip in the winter of 2008-09 known as Operation Cast Lead, Israel barred foreign journalists from entering the besieged enclave. In fact, Berman relates that Kissinger is of the view that Israel should “throw out television, à la South Africa.” Most recently, Israel has expanded such barring of entry to include several NGOs and advocacy organizations whose work has exposed Israeli violations of human rights. And in the aftermath of Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital, Israel has deployed brutal force to quash non-violent Palestinian protests of the decision, which has led to the deaths of tens of Palestinians and hundreds of injuries, so far.”